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Andreas Nebenführ

Contact Info

FacultyNebenfuhrAndreas Nebenführ
Professor, BCMB

Office: Hesler 240: (865-974-9201)
Lab: Hesler 217/218: (865-974-4927)
Email: nebenfuehr@utk.edu

Ph.D. Molecular and Cellular Biology, Oregon State University

Research Statement

The main focus of our lab is to study transport within plant cells and their function in setting up and maintaining the differential distribution of cellular components from proteins to organelles. The central objects of the research are myosin proteins in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This class of motor proteins can move entire organelles through the cell and is also responsible for cytoplasmic streaming. These movements are likely to affect the functioning of organelles in the secretory system that have a constant exchange of membranes and proteins between them. As a second line of inquiry we are also studying these membrane transport processes, particularly to and from the Golgi apparatus. Our research involves cell-biological, biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches, such as live-cell imaging, tissue culture, protein-protein interactions, mutant analysis, proteomics. Additional information can be found on the Nebenführ lab page.

nebenfuhr_lab

Selected Publications

J.K. Vick, A. Nebenführ (2012) Putting on the breaks: Regulating organelle movements in plant cells. Journal of Integrative Plant Biology 54: 868-874.

 S.L. Madison, A. Nebenführ (2011) Live-cell imaging of dual-labeled Golgi stacks in tobacco BY-2 cells reveals similar behaviors for different cisternae during movement and brefeldin A treatment. Molecular Plant 4: 896-908.

S.L. Madison, A. Nebenführ (2013) Understanding myosin functions in plants: are we there yet? Current Opinion in Plant Biology 16:710-717.

E. Park, A. Nebenführ (2013) Myosin XIK of Arabidopsis thaliana Accumulates at the Root Hair Tip and Is Required for Fast Root Hair Growth. PLOS ONE 8:e76745.

S.L. Madison, A. Nebenführ (2011) Live-cell imaging of dual-labeled Golgi stacks in tobacco BY-2 cells reveals similar behaviors for different cisternae during movement and brefeldin A treatment. Molecular Plant 4: 896-908.

J.-F. Li, E. Park, A.G. von Arnim, A. Nebenführ (2009) The FAST technique: a simplified Agrobacterium-based transformation method for transient gene expression analysis in seedlings of Arabidopsis and other plant species. Plant Methods 5:6.

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